Chronic treatment with sulbutiamine improves memory in an object recognition task and reduces some amnesic effects of dizocilpine in a spatial delayed-non-match-to-sample task
by
Bizot JC, Herpin A, Pothion S, Pirot S, Trovero F, Ollat H.
Key-Obs S.A., Centre d'Innovation,
16 rue Leonard de Vinci,
45074 Orleans Cedex 2, France.
jcbizot@key-obs.com
Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2005 Jul;29(6):928-35.


ABSTRACT

The effect of a sulbutiamine chronic treatment on memory was studied in rats with a spatial delayed-non-match-to-sample (DNMTS) task in a radial maze and a two trial object recognition task. After completion of training in the DNMTS task, animals were subjected for 9 weeks to daily injections of either saline or sulbutiamine (12.5 or 25 mg/kg). Sulbutiamine did not modify memory in the DNMTS task but improved it in the object recognition task. Dizocilpine, impaired both acquisition and retention of the DNMTS task in the saline-treated group, but not in the two sulbutiamine-treated groups, suggesting that sulbutiamine may counteract the amnesia induced by a blockade of the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors. Taken together, these results are in favor of a beneficial effect of sulbutiamine on working and episodic memory.

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